Inside the New Schoolhouse: What Boards Can Do to Improve Student Learning, January/February 2014

Trusteeship Magazine Cover image
January/February
2014
Volume: 
22
Number: 
1

The January/February issue of Trusteeship offers readers a series of stories—Inside the New Schoolhouse: What Boards Can Do to Improve Student Learning—on a topic of paramount interest to board members and other higher education leaders. Comprehensive coverage includes Peter T. Ewell on The Growing Interest in Academic Quality; Ellen-Earle Chaffee on Learning Metrics: How Can We Know that Students Know What They Are Supposed to Know?; Rebecca-Klein Collins, Stanley O. Ikenberry, and George D. Kuh on Competency-Based Education: What the Board Needs to Know; and a final piece on Lessons Learned about Student Learning: Eight Test Cases. This first issue of the new year is rounded out by David Rubenstein and Richard Riddell writing on Board Chairs and Board Professionals: Partners in Governance; Joseph S. Johnston Jr. on Interim Senior-Level Appointments: Why, When, How?; and Larry D. Shinn on Liberal Education vs. Professional Education: The False Choice. We look forward to hearing from you in 2014.

The Growing Interest in Academic Quality

Peter T. Ewell

Escalating demands for accountability, increased competition in the market for students, and the development of evidence-based management techniques are pointing to a growing need for new kinds of information about academic quality.

Learning Metrics: How Can We Know That Students Know What They Are Supposed to Know?

For both fiduciary and reputational reasons, boards must effectively oversee the quality of student learning at their institutions, including the appropriate ways to assess and measure it.

Lessons Learned about Student Learning: Eight Test Cases

The experience of eight diverse institutions provide insight into the elements that contribute to successful board oversight of educational quality—as well as the potential pitfalls to avoid.

Competency-Based Education: What the Board Needs to Know

Rebecca Klein-Collins, Stanley O. Ikenberry, and George D. Kuh

Increasingly, the current concept of higher education is being replaced by teaching and learning approaches that focus squarely on evidence of what students actually know and can do with what they know.

Board Chairs and Board Professionals: Partners in Governance

David Rubenstein and Richard Riddell

A board chair and board professional share lessons learned in the key areas where their collaboration contributes most to the board’s work: education, planning, and communication

Interim Senior-Level Appointments: Why, When, How?

Joseph S. Johnston Jr.

The tenures of people holding executive-level positions in higher education are increasingly short, and institutions have responded by considering more interim appointments.

Liberal Education vs. Professional Education: The False Choice

Larry D. Shinn

Does an unbridgeable chasm between “liberal education” and “professional training” truly exist?

Faculty Members and Free Speech Part II: Four Principles for Boards

Lawrence White

What happens when faculty members assert a constitutionally protected right to speak their minds?

The Benefits of Good Board Governance

William E. Troutt

The right questions give board members a chance to fully contribute their experience and insight, keeping them engaged, invested, and eager to contribute their intellectual capital.

Building Strong Working Relationships

Robert F. Cioffi

Our colleges and universities, at their essence, are about effective connections—to our students, to our communities and states, to the pressing issues of our society.

What Should Board Members Know about Fundraising?

Patricia P. Jackson

Fundraising is one of a board’s most basic and important responsibilities, and it is key to an institution’s financial stability. Patricia P. Jackson talks about what board members must know and do in order to be effective fundraisers for their college or university.