National Conference on Trusteeship

Workshop: April 12-14, 2019  • Preconference Workshops: April 13-14, 2019 • Conference: April 14-16, 2019
Orlando, Florida

AGB’s National Conference on Trusteeship brings governing board members together with leading thinkers, policymakers, innovators and influencers in a lively and collaborative forum designed to help higher education leaders better navigate the currents of change and strengthen their institutions.

At the National Conference, you will explore higher education’s most challenging issues and their impact on board governance and presidential leadership. Facilitated by presenters regarded as experts in higher education, our program will inspire ideas and fresh perspectives that are packaged into lessons learned for you to take back to your board.

Come interact with your colleagues and let your voice be heard at the only national conference for governing boards as we drive change and advance higher education.

View 2019 Program

Topics Include…

1

Deciphering millennial donors

2

Succession planning

3

Student retention and the role of the board

4

Title IX

5

Cybersecurity for college

6

Affiliations, mergers, and collaborations

Schedule

Sunday, April 14

3:30 pm – 4:15 pm | Preliminary Conversations

Orientation to the Conference Program

Location: Lake Concord A Meeting Room

The 2019 National Conference on Trusteeship is comprised of 20 master classes, 20 governance seminars, 20 tabletop conversations, and four plenary sessions, not to mention numerous special meetings and receptions. In this session, an AGB senior fellow and a distinguished international university president will provide a succinct overview of the program, answer participant questions, and make suggestions concerning how to spend your conference time to get the most out of the experience.

 

Facilitators:

Joseph Burke, president emeritus, Keuka College; senior fellow, AGB

Fernando León García, president, CETYS University System

 

Leaders of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room A

Leadership of historically Black colleges and universities faces enormous challenges, notwithstanding their extraordinary value. While the same might be said for much of American higher education, the issues confronting HBCUs are distinctive. Come to this session to join with fellow board members and senior administrators to identify key issues and explore targets of opportunity for HBCUs and how boards and those who work with them can achieve sustainability.

 

Facilitator:

Alvin Schexnider, former chancellor, Winston-Salem State University; senior fellow, AGB

 

LGBTQIA Members

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room B

The needs and perspectives of LGBTQIA students and employees frequently are under-represented, or nonexistent, in campus diversity and inclusion initiatives. This panel will share best practices based upon experience to mitigate this issue and also discuss strategies to deal with recent experiences on several campuses with white supremacist organizations and calls for identity or safe spaces.  Our focus will be on how trustees can be supportive, helpful, or harmful during times of unrest or with inclusion initiatives for LGBTQIA populations and other under-represented/marginalized populations.  Audience participation will tailor the discussions to the institutions represented in the audience.

 

Moderator:

Charles Middleton, former chair, City Colleges of Chicago Board of Trustees; president emeritus, Roosevelt University

 

Panel Members:

Erika Endrijonas, president, Pasadena City College

Richard Helldobler, president, William Paterson University

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm | Welcome Remarks and Reflections on AGB Leadership

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

Speakers:

Richard D. Legon, trustee, Spelman College; president, AGB

David Miles, trustee, Drake University; chair, AGB board of directors

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm | Opening Keynote: Leading for Creativity

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

What can your institution learn about developing a culture of innovation from The Walt Disney Company’s example? Based on 25 years with the company, most recently as vice president of innovation and creativity, Duncan Wardle will examine some of the key techniques and behaviors Disney’s board and executive leadership have developed to encourage creativity across the organization.

Speaker:

Duncan Wardle, former vice president of innovation and creativity, The Walt Disney Company

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm | Opening Reception

Location: The Promenade

Join fellow higher education leaders for drinks and plenty of hors d’oeuvre. Conference registrants are welcome free of charge. Additional guest tickets are available for purchase in advance or at the registration desk on the lobby level for $50.

TIAA
(Sponsor: TIAA)

7:30 pm – 9:00 pm | Live Concert - The Boss Project

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

Enjoy all the greatest hits of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band as performed by tribute group The Boss Project. Guests of conference participants that are staying in the hotel are welcome to join!

Monday, April 15

7:00 am - 8:15 am | Breakfast

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

8:30 am – 9:30 am | Concurrent Sessions I

Master Classes  

Master Classes focus in on a topic of strategic importance to higher education leaders. Experts in the field will speak for 30 minutes, allowing time for substantive exchange with the audience.

 

Top Strategic Issues: Where Boards Are Needed

Location: Orlando Ballroom IV

You know what the major challenges facing your institution are, but do you know what the board is accountable for, and how the board can have a positive impact when it comes to these issues? Starting with the framework of AGB’s Top Strategic Issues for Boards 2018-2019, presenters in this session will provide a succinct overview of how boards can, do, and should touch the big challenges, followed by an expanded Q&A period to help you get the answers you need.

 

Session Leader:

David Maxwell, president emeritus, Drake University; trustee, Grinnell College

 

Student Retention in Public Institutions (Part I): Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Location: Orlando Ballroom V

Once a student enters a college or a university, their persistence through completion of an educational program becomes a shared responsibility between them and the institution. But for a variety of reasons the pressures around student retention are growing and becoming deeply complex, particularly in public institutions. In this, the first in a sequence of two sessions, participants will learn the lay of the land around this important issue, from an introduction of key terminology to the realities of student preparedness today, the impact of campus climate, and the “dollars and sense” of student retention.

 

Session Leaders:

Gary Fretwell, senior vice president, Ruffalo Noel Levitz

Jim Hundrieser, managing director, AGB Consulting

 

Higher Education for a Healthy Democracy 

Location: Orlando Ballroom VI

The U.S. higher education system, in all of its diversity, is a product of democracy, having matured alongside the nation and its people over the course of nearly four centuries. Today, there is good evidence that colleges and universities contribute to the nation’s civic health, educating students for citizenship and contributing to economic and social well-being. Yet skepticism about the value of higher education, including its effectiveness as an engine of American democracy, is concerning. Grounded in AGB’s Guardians Initiative, this session will help board members to understand their roles as trustees of public purpose.

 

Session Leader:

Paul Pribbenow, president, Augsburg University

 

Deciphering Millennial Donors

Location: Orlando Ballroom A

Findings from the 2018 U.S. Trust Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy are shining a light on the philanthropic practices of wealthy millennials. In this interactive session, Dianne will explore the findings of this year’s study to help attendees understand how giving patterns are changing generationally, provide university and college foundations with guidance on how to prepare for increasingly diverse donor bases, and discuss how the priorities of these emerging philanthropists will be reflected in the fundraising practices and governance processes of colleges and universities.

 

Session Leader:

Dianne Chipps Bailey, managing director, US Trust

 

Governance Seminars

Governance Seminars provide learning opportunities to help participants raise their board’s performance through highly effective policies and best practices.

 

The Work of a Fiduciary

Location: Lake Eola Meeting Room

What must board members do, or not do, to meet the legal standards of conduct that apply to them as fiduciaries?  To whom do they owe a responsibility, for what are they accountable, and how should they determine whether they have satisfied their duties? What potential personal liabilities do board members face? Back by popular demand, and appropriate for new board members and old hands alike, come to this session for a concise, practical primer on the fundamental legal responsibilities of board members.

 

Session Leaders:

Katie Herschede, chief of staff, Widener University

Tom Hyatt, partner, Dentons US LLP

 

Leadership Strategies for Board Chairs of Independent Colleges and Universities

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room

It is hard to imagine a time when boards of higher education institutions have needed more effective leadership. Board chairs must lead the charge, with the support of vice chairs, committee chairs, and other board leaders. What will be your leadership legacy? This session provides practical suggestions to enhance board engagement, productivity, and cohesiveness; greater insight into key issues board leaders are likely to confront; and ultimately, strategies for board success.

 

Session Leaders:

Yvonne Jackson, former chair, Spelman College

Martin Michaelson, senior counsel, Hogan-Lovells

 

Public-Private Partnerships:  Successful Board Engagement in This Big Decision

Location: Orange B

With colleges and universities facing the ever-increasing pressures of competing for students in an environment of unfavorable demographics, shrinking state appropriations and other sources of funds while staring down the barrel of a rapidly deteriorating physical infrastructure, why is it that higher education leadership still tends to chart the safest course along the path of least resistance? Session leaders will explore this dynamic through the prism of risk, and how the fate of a university can summarily be determined by how boards and leaders choose (or don’t) to assess, address, and alleviate risk.

 

Session Leaders:

William Kahn, professor of organizational behavior, Questrom School of Business at Boston University

Shawn Kerachsky, strategist, Corvias

 

Understanding Faculty Productivity

Location: Orange C

While professors are well known as teachers and mentors to students, their work in the classroom is just one component of their complex role. They are also the heart and soul of campus research and innovation and key employees at a university. Faculty also are revenue generators through grants and funding they earn and receive. And they play a critical role in university governance. Better understanding the breadth of what faculty members do and how they think about higher ed will support board members in making informed decisions. Come to this session to learn what board members and trustees need to know about the tenure process, the faculty life course, academic freedom, and ultimately faculty productivity.

Session Leader:

Kerry Ann Rockquemore, founder, National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity

9:45 am – 10:45 am | Concurrent Sessions II

Master Classes  

Master Classes focus in on a topic of strategic importance to higher education leaders. Experts in the field will speak for 30 minutes, allowing time for substantive exchange with the audience.

 

Engaging Student Voices at the Highest Levels

Location: Orlando Ballroom IV

Students are essential to colleges and universities—at once customers, assets, and eventually products of higher education. Listening to their concerns and helping them achieve their aspirations is important at all levels of leadership. But, in contentious times, who is ultimately responsible for hearing students, what are sound practices from a governance perspective, and what does success look like in the board room?

 

Session Leader:

Kristen Hodge-Clark, vice president for best practices and innovation, AGB; trustee, College of St. Benedict

 

Serving American Student Veterans

Location: Orlando Ballroom V

Veterans are responsible in no small part for the growth and maturation of the U.S. higher education sector in the latter 20th century. But ten years following the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, with more than 5 million veterans under age 50, how well are colleges and universities serving student veterans? This session will unpack the special needs and contributions of veterans to campus environments, and the ways in which boards can ensure institutions are making a difference in their lives.

 

Session Leaders:

Martin Dinan, COL, USA (Ret.); director of veteran enrollment, College of Saint Rose

Carolyn Stefanco, president, College of St. Rose

 

Succession Planning in the Age of New Expectations

Location: Orlando Ballroom VI

Since 1986, the average age of chief executive officers of U.S. colleges and universities has risen a full ten years, from 52 to 62, and nearly one-quarter of today’s presidents arrived in the role following a prior presidency. Over the same period, the U.S. trustees ages 30-49 have declined from nearly 30% to less than 15%, and today the fastest-growing age group is 70 or older. Ensuring effective transition in leadership roles is essential to the board’s fiduciary duty of care. Come to this session to strengthen your vantage on the intergenerational shifts affecting boards and presidents, and more broadly how your board can make sure succession means success.

 

Session Leaders:

Roderick McDavis, president emeritus, Ohio University; managing principal, AGB Search

Melissa Trotta, associate managing principal, AGB Search

 

University Research, Discovery, and Innovation

Location: Orange A

Since the second world war, much of the scientific progress produced in the United States has been made possible, in part or whole, by colleges and universities. Yet, the nature of academic research—and the outlook for continued national leadership in discovery and innovation—has changed over time. Research, unlike in teaching, or economic development, is increasingly perceived to be ancillary to the core purposes of higher education. Stemming from AGB’s Guardians Initiative, participants in this session will learn and discuss how board members can move university research forward as an essential driver of national and international progress.

 

Session Leader:

Sally Mason, president emerita, University of Iowa; senior fellow, AGB

 

Governance Seminars

Governance Seminars provide learning opportunities to help participants raise their board’s performance through highly effective policies and best practices.

 

Student Retention in Public Institutions (Part II): The Board’s Role in Trailblazing

Orlando Ballroom V

The board has a fundamental responsibility to ensure the institution has effective policies in place to drive student learning, satisfaction, and ultimately retention to graduation. But does your board understand your institution’s current strengths and weaknesses in the student life-cycle? Which opportunities could be around the corner, and what are the blindspots to beware? In this, the second of two sessions focused on student retention in public institutions, participants will dig deeper on what board members need to know to ask value-added questions on this essential topic.

 

Session Leader:

Jim Hundrieser, managing director, AGB Consulting

Terri Dautcher, senior consultant, AGB

 

Title IX: What Every Board Member Needs to Know

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room

While colleges and universities are not courts of law, each maintains policies for ensuring gender equity and dealing with allegations of sexual misconduct by students, faculty, and staff. Federal guidance in this area has become a moving target, with sharply divergent policy emerging from the U.S. Department of Education in late 2018. In which ways, and for what, are institutions accountable when it comes to sexual misconduct—and particularly, what is the role of the board?

 

Session Leaders:

Pamela Bernard, vice president and general counsel, Duke University

Joshua Richards, partner, Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr, LLP; trustee, Peirce College

 

Governance Assessment

Location: Lake Eola Meeting Room

In this session, participants will examine what it means for a governing board to see the forest through the trees when it comes to assessment. You evaluate each board member’s performance, and that of the full board, regularly and use the results thoughtfully. Your board conducts meaningful assessments of the president’s performance. Your board maintains a highly informative set of institutional performance indicators. Within each of its assessment activities the board is well-studied and diligent. But, how can the board know how well governance is working overall?

 

Session Leader:

Terrance MacTaggart, former chancellor, University of Maine System and Minnesota State Colleges and Universities

 

Emerging Endowment Trends

Location: Orange C

Each year, public and private American colleges and universities share their endowment return data and a broad range of related information. An analysis of this vast amount of data provides insights regarding investment management and governance practices and policies of higher education institutions across the U.S. This session will provide unique findings with corresponding implications that are specific and relevant to AGB members. Attendees will learn how to understanding the performance of their endowments and incorporate strategic methodologies to maximize investment performance from the endowment, drive resource optimization and long-term financial sustainability, and ultimately fulfill their institutions’ missions.

 

Session Leader:

Michael Collins, director of endowment and foundation services, TIAA Endowment and Philanthropic Services

11:15 am - 12:15pm | Concurrent Sessions III

Master Classes  

Master Classes focus in on a topic of strategic importance to higher education leaders. Experts in the field will speak for 30 minutes, allowing time for substantive exchange with the audience.

 

The Board’s Role in Cybersecurity

Location: Orlando Ballroom IV

Higher education institutions possess large quantities of sensitive information. They face the daily challenge of protecting this information from cybersecurity and information technology (IT) risk while carrying out their missions. However, of necessity and opportunity, data sharing has increased in frequency, creating vulnerability to attacks and giving rise to disputes over control and protection of the data. Do you know how your institution is working together to protect these critical assets? And who has the right to use it? What is the full scope of the board’s responsibility, and how might board members unfamiliar with the technology and threats ensure nonetheless that the institution is acting with appropriate diligence when it comes to the data in its care (e.g., personal information, intellectual property, student and employee records)? During this interactive session, participants will discuss threats and risks to data, legal and regulatory compliance challenges, and strategies to ensure that cybersecurity protections are up to the task.

Session Leaders:

Mike Cullen, cybersecurity and IT risk senior manager, Baker Tilly
Nilufer Shroff, chief audit and compliance officer, Princeton University

Student Demographic Shifts: What’s the Long View?

Location: Lake Eola Meeting Room

What will student demand be for your institution in the next 7 to 10 years, and what can you do to prepare? Due to shifting birth rates and immigration patterns, beginning in 2026, the population of traditional-age students will fall nearly 15 percent in just five years in regions with the largest supply of higher education. Attend this session to gain the latest insights on population shifts that may affect your institution.

Session Leaders:

Goldie Blumenstyk, senior writer, Chronicle of Higher Education

Patrick Lane, vice president for policy analysis and research, Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education

Charles Ramos, vice president for strategic partnerships,
Collegis Education


Accreditation: Getting Value from Peer Review
and Preserving Institutional Autonomy

Location: Orlando Ballroom VI

As questions about educational quality and institutional integrity heighten the tenor of debate over the value of a college education, accreditation is as essential as it has ever been. Without it, most institutions’ autonomy would be reduced, and federal control increased. However, accreditation can sometimes seem little more than a pro forma exercise—or, on the other hand, an impediment to innovation. What is accreditation, what is it meant to accomplish, and how can the board ensure it contributes to institutional success? In this session, experts will reveal the hidden gems of board engagement with accreditation.

Session Leaders:

David Maxwell, president emeritus, Drake University; trustee, Grinnell College; chair, Council for Higher Education Accreditation; senior fellow, AGB

Alvin Schexnider, former chancellor, Winston-Salem State University; senior fellow, AGB

Innovative Approaches to Ensuring Higher Education’s Value Proposition

Location: Orange Ballroom A

Since AGB launched the Guardians Initiative™ in 2017, colleges and universities across the country have realized the need and opportunity for board members to advocate for the value of higher education. One of the most ambitious plans to date involves a partnership between higher education institutions and local businesses in the Philadelphia metropolitan area to showcase the benefits of an educated workforce to new businesses and workers. Hear from leaders of this effort as they discuss key experiences, including opportunities they’ve explored, challenges they’ve faced, and the vision they have for Philadelphia as the nation’s first “Guardians City.”

Moderator:

Kevin Reilly, president emeritus, University of Wisconsin System; senior fellow, AGB

Panel Members:

Paul Beideman, vice chair, Widener University board of trustees

Julie Wollman, president, Widener University

Governance Seminars

Governance Seminars provide learning opportunities to help participants raise their board’s performance through highly effective policies and best practices.

 

Presidential Assessment in the Age of Enterprise Leadership

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room

Once an afterthought, regular assessment of a chief executive’s work, not just hiring, is now recognized by many boards as an essential responsibility. Essential questions at this stage revolve around various approaches, tools, and timing. How and when can the board best set expectations with the president? How can expectations be adjusted as time goes on? What can your board do to refresh the routine? Come to this session to gain important insights on how presidential assessment can work for you.

Session Leader:

Steven Bahls, president, Augustana University

Leveraging Diverse Trustee Perspectives and Ideologies

Location: Orange Ballroom C

Your board is becoming more diverse by age, gender, race, geography, and profession. Congratulations! Now what? The benefits of a diverse board do not occur on their own. In this session, the facilitator will offer helpful approaches and tactics to cultivate meaningful dialogue and constructive debate—especially among board members with different life experiences, knowledge bases, and habits of thought.

Senior Leader:

Bethami Dobkin, president, Westminster College

Affiliations, Collaborations, and Mergers (Part I)

Location: Orlando Ballroom V

Governing boards and chief executives are often keenly attuned to the competitive side of college and university governance but planning for the future increasingly raises important questions about cooperation as well. In this first of a two-part series, participants will gain an understanding of the spectrum of possibilities in this area, and the questions boards should be asking at each level of prospective collaboration.

Moderator:
Richard Beyer, lead consultant and special advisor to the president, AGB

 

Strategic Approaches to Graduate and Professional Education

Location: Orange Ballroom B

Graduate education is not only a key element of many institutions’ missions but is often important because of the revenue it generates, and the teaching and research sup-port it enables. Shifts in student demand for advanced degrees in business and law, lengthy times to degree in many fields, and ultimately the rising costs being born by these programs mean that many boards must attend to the work of the institution in areas that have sometimes received less attention. Come to this session to learn about the challenges affecting graduate programs and professional fields today, and how the board can best fulfill its responsibilities in these areas.

Session Leader:

Hironao Okahana, associate vice president for research and policy analysis, Council of Graduate Schools

1:00 pm - 2:15 pm | Afternoon Keynote: The Power of Teaching and Learning

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

Inspirational educator and author Erin Gruwell has earned an award-winning reputation for her steadfast commitment to the future of education. By fostering an educational philosophy that values and promotes diversity, she has transformed students’ lives. During this session, you will hear about the work she did with the Freedom Writers, her ongoing efforts to inspire innovation in the classroom, and what it means to be in the business of changing lives.

Introduction:

Eleanor Horne, trustee, The College of New Jersey; member, AGB Board of Directors

Speaker:

Erin Gruwell, founder and executive director, Freedom Writers Foundation

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm | Tabletop Conversations

Location: Orlando Ballroom III

Tabletop topics are offered up for small-group, unfacilitated peer-to-peer learning. Tables will be labeled to assist participants with selection, and staff will be on hand to help with suggested starter questions. Participants are encouraged to move among the tables as much as they wish, and everyone will have the opportunity to engage in two complete 45-minute conversations.

  1. Advocating for State Support
  2. Things I Wish I Knew in my First Year on the Board
  3. Building Your Relationship with the President
  4. Board Orientation and Education
  5. Student Trustees
  6. The Academic Affairs Committee
  7. Strategic Board Agendas
  8. Board Evaluation
  9. Nontraditional Presidencies
  10. Asserting the Value of MSIs (historically Black, Hispanic-serving, and tribal institutions)
  11. The Finance Committee
  12. Engaging the Board with Internal Constituents
  13. Moving to Term Limits
  14. The Governance Committee
  15. Leveraging Staff Liaisons for Board Effectiveness
  16. Orienting New Presidents to the Work of Boards
  17. Public University and System Relationships with Supporting Foundations
  18. Effective Use of Advisory Councils
  19. Creating Community “Anchor” Institutions
  20. Coping with Higher Ed’s PR Problem

4:15 pm - 4:30 pm | Honoring the Recipients of the John W. Nason Award for Board Leadership

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

AGB seeks to recognize governing boards that have demonstrated innovation and exemplary leadership by bestowing the AGB John W. Nason Award for Board Leadership. Serving at the pinnacle of excellence, these are boards that advance their institutions in ways that truly matter. This year we are celebrating the accomplishments of six boards that strengthened their institutions, reimagined board work, and made a significant difference to the students they serve. The recipients are:

  • Furman University board of trustees
  • Haverford College board of managers
  • Kansas State University Foundation board of directors
  • Miami University board of trustees
  • St. John’s University board of trustees
  • Youngstown State University board of trustees

4:30 pm - 5:45 pm | Plenary: Peering Around Corners: An Outlook for Higher Education

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

Where do universities stand following the seating of the 116th Congress and the political upheaval of late 2018? Global and geopolitical pressures, a fragile economy, a contentious federal landscape, and the public’s perception of higher education are potential factors affecting the direction of colleges and universities. In this Q&A session, the speakers will address the current political and economic backdrop for higher education and how boards and senior administration can successfully lead their institutions through it.

 

Introduction:

Nelson Carbonell, chair, George Washington University Board of Trustees; member, AGB Board of Directors

 

Speaker:

Marci Rossell, former chief economist, CNBC

 

Interviewer:

Verne Sedlacek, trustee, Valparaiso University; former member, AGB Board of Directors

Tuesday, April 16

7:00 am - 8:15 am | Breakfast

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

7:00 am - 8:15 am | Special Breakfast Session for Women Trustees

Location: Orlando Ballroom III

A traditional strength of American higher education governance is that board members are the very leaders of society their students must someday become. Yet even as women have surpassed men in degree attainment at every level of postsecondary education, their numbers have stagnated in senior leadership roles in colleges and universities, including within boardrooms. Women’s voices are needed in full and robust ways at the highest levels of leadership. AGB invites women trustees to this exclusive session to discuss shared experiences and opportunities to bring women’s voices more fully to bear as an institutional asset.

Facilitators:

Bethami Dobkin, president, Westminster College

Beverly Seay, trustee, University of Central Florida; vice chair, AGB Board of Directors

8:30 am – 9:30 am | Concurrent Sessions IV

Master Classes 

Master Classes focus in on a topic of strategic importance to higher education leaders. Experts in the field will speak for 30 minutes, allowing time for substantive exchange with the audience.

 

Finding the Curriculum of the Future: Student Need, Market Appeal, and Institutional Mission

Location: Orlando Ballroom IV

Today, students’ sense of their own educational need is strong, and it often departs from what institutions have traditionally delivered, or sold. Boards can tip the scales to ensure an institution’s academic planning is something more than a rote exercise. Come to this session to learn where and how the board can best help its institution out of an academic planning rut.

 

Session Leader:

Mary Hinton, president, College of St. Benedict

 

A Blockchain QuickStart for Boards

Location: Orlando Ballroom V

Blockchain technology will enable the Web 3.0, but what is the business value and organizational strategy for higher education? In this session, participants will explore three applications that indicate institutional value: next-gen investments, universal transcripts, and smart contracts. Participants will discuss real examples that point to actionable initiatives and leave the session ready to discuss blockchain beyond the hype and “geek speak” with board colleagues and senior staff.

 

Session Leader:

David Metcalf, senior researcher and director of the mixed emerging technology integration lab (METIL), University of Central Florida Institute for Simulation and Training

 

Civil Education, Civil Society

Location: Lake Eola Meeting Room

Most Americans agree that we are in a fraught political and societal moment marked by serious partisan and social divides. Voices of reason and compromise are drowned out by widespread anger, distrust, and fear. If our society is to regain an ability to argue civilly and respectfully and to evoke the democratic virtues that make our nation distinct, higher education must play an essential role. Institutions of higher education can and should play a vital role in preparing each generation of engaged and enlightened citizens who will learn the skills necessary to identify, articulate, and pursue the common good. And governing boards can have enormous influence as informed stewards and leaders to speak with independent credibility about the genuine benefits of higher education to individuals and to American society. Moreover, they can work with campus leadership and faculty to ensure that the values of a civil and democratic society are embedded in their campus policies. Come to this session to discuss and sharpen your own understanding of how higher education, with the help of boards, can be a key transmitter of civil society.

 

Session Leader:

Jonathan Alger, president, James Madison University

 

Embracing Educational Equity (Part I): What Every Board Member Should Know
Location: Orange A

Boards and presidents are under intense pressure to ensure institutions offer students of all backgrounds a full opportunity to learn. Yet there is still a great deal of confusion about what equity means in the context of a college or university and how it contributes to broader institutional goals. The first session in this special two-part series will unpack how boards’ responsibilities include ensuring educational equity. Attendees will leave with a solid understanding of why equity is important to issues such as institutional mission, student learning and success, faculty retention, accreditation, and why and how boards in particular are accountable for equity in higher education.

 

Session Leaders:

Felecia Commodore, assistant professor in educational foundations and leadership, Old Dominion University

Demetri Morgan, assistant professor of higher education, Loyola University Chicago

Raquel Rall, assistant professor of higher education, University of California Riverside

 

Governance Seminars

Governance Seminars provide learning opportunities to help participants raise their board’s performance through highly effective policies and best practices.

 

Giving and Getting: Board Strategies for Leading Philanthropy

Location: Orange B

College and university boards are relied upon for an array of leadership responsibilities, but in few instances is this role more consistently essential to institutional success than in securing philanthropic support. In spite of proven member impact in this space, effective board engagement is inconsistent. While individual members are often recruited in part for their philanthropic capacity and personal networks, moving the whole board to higher level performance requires wisdom, savvy, and fortitude. Come to this session to learn key principles and best practices for moving the needle.

 

Session Leader:

James L. Lanier, former vice chancellor for institutional Advancement, East Carolina University, and president, ECU foundation and ECU real estate foundation; senior fellow, AGB

 

Institutional Crises: Making Board Governance an Asset

Location: Lake Mizell Meeting Room

Boards dealing with crisis situations in 2019 must treat as gospel the hard truth that the worst of the facts will always come out. There may have been times in the past when institutions could handle crises privately and discretely, but with intense media scrutiny of institutional misconduct and the prevalence of social media, those days are long gone. What’s more, boards must understand that their own actions in the wake of crisis revelations will become part of the story.  Come to this session for guidance as to how boards can meet their fiduciary responsibilities while balancing competing objectives of minimizing legal and reputational risk.

 

Session Leader:

Benjamin O’Neil, partner, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan

 

Having a Candid Conversation on the Business Model: Affordability and Sustainability

Location: Orlando Ballroom VI

Many colleges and universities are experiencing revenue constraints and cost increases that comprise a long-term threat to current business models. Two-thirds of college and university business officers think their business models are unsustainable. Boards have a fiduciary duty to ensure their institutions are mission-driven and fiscally sound, yet change and innovation are a challenge. Come to this session to learn how to frame the conversation well, encourage necessary “grit” on the part of the board, recognize warning signs, consider new ideas, and agree on the right information to govern effectively.

 

Session Leaders:

Charles Kim, managing director, Kaufman Hall

Merrill Schwartz, senior vice president, AGB Consulting

 

Institution-Foundation Relations: An Essential Partnership

Location: Orange C

The relationships between public universities and their affiliated foundations are evolving as public funding continues to decrease and institutions seek additional resources to fulfill their missions. Foundations are being asked to go beyond traditional roles of asset management and take on greater responsibility for fundraising, campaign leadership and entrepreneurial ventures. Alignment of the foundation’s mission and strategy with that of the university is more important than ever. In this session, you will discuss and learn about key principles and best practices in building and maintaining a highly effective partnership between the institution and its supporting foundation.

 

Session Leaders:

Lori Buckheister, president, Georgia Gwinnett College Foundation

Leonard Raley, president and CEO, University System of Maryland Foundation

9:45 am - 10:50 am | Plenary: An Anatomy of Good Board Governance—Implications for the Work of the Board

Location: Orlando Ballroom I/II

Heightened internal stresses, along with growing public skepticism about the value of higher education, present significant challenges for colleges and universities—and raise the stakes for their fiduciaries. If boards are to avoid governance failures that can put institutional priorities, success, and reputation at risk, they must raise the bar for their own performance. An Anatomy of Good Board Governance in Higher Education, AGB’s new signature publication, presents a governance standard specifically developed to help boards understand and apply the principles of good board governance and assess and improve their own governance practice. In this final plenary session, panelists will discuss how this new standard can be used to raise expectations for all higher education fiduciary bodies.

Introduction:

Monroe Miller, trustee, Johnson C. Smith University; member, AGB Board of Directors

Moderator: 

Richard D. Legon, trustee, Spelman College; president, AGB

Speakers:

Richard Chait, trustee emeritus, Wheaton College; professor emeritus, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Artis Hampshire-Cowan, former senior vice president and secretary, Howard University; senior fellow, AGB

Abdul Omari, regent, University of Minnesota

Shauna Ryder Diggs, regent, University of Michigan; vice chair, AGB Board of Directors

11:00 am - 12:00 pm | Concurrent Sessions V

Master Classes  

Master Classes focus in on a topic of strategic importance to higher education leaders. Experts in the field will speak for 30 minutes, allowing time for substantive exchange with the audience.

 

Big Data Everywhere: Predictive Analytics as a Tool for Student Success

Location: Orlando Ballroom IV

The quintessential idea of the university is of an organization that is involved in an ever-expanding “universe” of academic work… with undergraduates, age 18-22, who are confident and single-minded about college. Reality is often closer to the opposite: institutions must be judicious with scarce resources, even as students become more diverse. Big data has changed everything from retail to national politics in the 21st century, so what should boards know about the experiences of early adopters in leveraging big data for student advising and student learning?

 

Session Leaders:

Randy Bass, vice provost for education and professor of English, Georgetown University

 

Understanding Endowments

Location: Orlando Ballroom V

U.S. colleges and universities hold over $500 billion in endowment assets—a sum whose purposes and value are poorly understood by an array of stakeholders. The urgency of greater public understanding of these funds was punctuated in 2018, when federal tax reforms that included a first-of-its-kind tax on private college and university endowments. Beginning with the findings of new research from AGB and the Urban Institute, in partnership with TIAA Institute, this session will address the question: what should every university and system foundation board member know and be prepared to discuss with stakeholders when it comes to endowments?

 

Session Leader:

Sandy Baum, nonresident senior fellow, The Urban Institute Center on Education Data and Policy; trustee, Bryn Mawr College

 

A Conversation on Board Leadership

Location: Orlando Ballroom VI

Each year, AGB recognizes a select few members with its John W. Nason Award, honoring boards that go above and beyond what boards should do, and instead take board-driven measures to advance their institutions in ways that truly matter. Come to this session to hear reflections and lessons learned by this year’s award winners, and discover what you can do to encourage effective, thoughtful, and courageous oversight by your board.

 

Moderator:

Ronald Parker, trustee, Texas Christian University; member, AGB Board of Directors

 

Panel Members:

David Budig, chair, Miami University Board of Trustees

Elizabeth Davis, president, Furman University

Conrado “Bobby” Gempesaw, president, St. John’s University

Garry Jenkins, vice chair, Haverford College Board of Managers

Molly Seals, trustee, Youngstown State University

Stephen Lacy, chair, Kansas State University Foundation Board of Directors

Governance Seminars

Governance Seminars provide learning opportunities to help participants raise their board’s performance through highly effective policies and best practices.

 

Embracing Educational Equity (part II): Board-Centered Approaches that Enhance Institutional Inclusion

Location: Orange A

How might institutions foster a more intentionally welcoming environment that encourages and supports an equity-centered campus, and how can boards ensure the institution is advancing appropriately on this front? While the term equity has become commonplace in board discussions, boards must become more than conversant in that set of issues to be appropriately accountable for the long-term success of their institutions. National experts will offer a clear, practical framework for equity as it pertains to board decision-making, composition, on-boarding, and review of key educational indicators. Presenters will review research-informed strategies and best practices for boards to get beyond platitudes and treat equity as a strategic asset for mission success.

 

Session Leaders:

Felecia Commodore, assistant professor in educational foundations and leadership, Old Dominion University

Demetri Morgan, assistant professor of higher education, Loyola University Chicago

Raquel Rall, assistant professor of higher education, University of California Riverside

 

Financial Stress Testing

Location: Orange B

Using stress tests is key to assessing institutional financial health and vitality. This session will define the concept of stress testing, describe forms of stress testing best suited to higher education, and examine what it means to act decisively on the results.

 

Session Leader:

Verne Sedlacek, member, Valparaiso University Board of Trustees; former member, AGB Board of Directors

 

Working with the Faculty (and Their Handbooks)

Location: Orange C

In times of scarce resources, shifting student markets, and fickle support from elected officials, some of the board’s most important decisions can reveal discomfort and misunderstanding with an institution’s faculty. Faculty and boards speak in tribal dialects, and while the president or chancellor can often be an effective go-between, a direct working relationship between the board and the faculty is indispensable. What can boards do when the dialogue with faculty gets harder, and what can they do to smooth the way for strong governance, effective leadership, and constructive engagement with faculty?

 

Session Leaders:

Susan Davenport, executive vice president and chief of staff, Stockton University

Richard Riddell, senior vice president and secretary to the board of trustees, Duke University

 

Affiliations, Collaborations, and Mergers (Part II): Getting Your Board Ready

Location: Lake Eola Meeting Room

Becoming “affiliation ready” can make the difference between mission fulfillment and economic failure. Yet, every institution must assess its own capacity to leverage integration with other organizations. Participants in this session will discuss best practices for both surveying the landscape of relevant possibilities and introducing the topic effectively with the board.

 

Session Leader:

Richard Beyer, lead consultant and special advisor to the president, AGB

 

Special Town Hall Discussion: Higher Education Public Policy

Location: Make Mizell Meeting Room

What might be projected for higher education in the 116th Congress, given that control of Congress is now split between the two major political parties? Can bi-partisanship emerge on any issue, or will bickering, contentiousness, and stalemate prevail? What regulations and rule-making can colleges and universities expect from the Department of Education, and what guidance may come from the Department of the Treasury on the higher education provisions of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act?  Meanwhile, several issues are likely to emerge in the states. What happens (or doesn’t happen) in the next two years may significantly affect the success of colleges and universities, students and families, and other stakeholders. You’re your peers in a conversation with leading experts to get the latest insights.

 

Session Leaders:

Terry Hartle, senior vice president for government and public affairs, American Council on Education

Timothy McDonough, vice president for government and public affairs, AGB

Individual Member Rates

Early-Bird (Ends January 15, 2019)
$1045
Pricing Expired
Regular Rate
$1195
Pricing Expired

Group Member Rates

Early-Bird (Ends January 15, 2019)
$995
Pricing Expired
Regular Rate
$1145
Pricing Expired

Non-Member Rate

Regular Rate
$1495
Pricing Expired

Workshop For Board Professionals

Early-Bird (Ends January 15, 2019)
$475
Pricing Expired
Regular Member Rate
$500
Pricing Expired
Regular Non-Member Rate
$550
Pricing Expired

Registration Cancellation Policy

All cancellations and requests for refunds must be submitted in writing to cancellations@agb.org and will be processed after the meeting. Requests for refunds must be received by March 1, 2019 to receive a full refund minus a $25 cancellation fee. No refunds will be issued after March 1, 2019. If you are unable to attend, a substitute is welcome in your place at no additional charge. Please notify registrar@agb.org of any changes to your registration. AGB is not responsible for cancellations due to airline disruption, inclement weather or schedule changes.

Hotel Reservation Deadline

The meeting will be held at the Hilton Orlando. The group room rate of $255 (exclusive of 12.5% tax and $2.25 per day fee) will be honored until March 15, 2019. Reservations should be made in the name of the person registered for the 2019 National Conference. Multiple reservations under the same name will not be accepted. Your credit card will be charged a (1) one-night deposit to guarantee each individual reservation. All reservations must be made online through the reservation link below. Call in reservations will not be accepted. If you have any questions regarding reservations please contact Lisa Biggs, AGB’s meetings coordinator at lbiggs@agb.org or (202) 776-0860.

Location

The 2019 National Conference on Trusteeship will be held at the Hilton Orlando in Orlando, Florida.

Hilton Orlando
6001 Destination Parkway
Orlando, FL 32819

Hotel

AGB has reserved a block of rooms at the Hilton Orlando to accommodate National Conference and Workshop participants. The room block rate will be available until Thursday, April 4, 2019.

Room rate ($255.00) + Tax (12.5%) and Fees ($2.25)

The normal $27 resort fee will be waived.

Instructions for making reservations will be available when you complete the registration process. To receive the AGB discounted rate, you must use the link found at the end of the registration process—not the hotel website. Telephone reservations will not receive the AGB discounted rate.

Local Attractions

Nestled just 15 minutes from the Orlando International Airport, Hilton Orlando boasts a prime location for visiting all the top attractions Orlando has to offer, from Walt Disney World Resort and Kennedy Space Center to Discovery Cove and Pointe Orlando. Explore exciting local attractions nearby.

Visit Orlando is the official source for discount theme park and attraction tickets. They offer exclusive deals and a convenient one-stop source for special deals and guaranteed discounted tickets. Make the most of every moment in Orlando, avoid standing in lines, and be assured with our destination expertise. Please view the FAQ tab for questions about ticketing. View FAQs.

Workshops have been scheduled strategically to enable you to register for a bundle of four (4) that corresponds to a particular area of interest. Suggested workshop bundles:

Saturday, April 13

Track A: Student Success
8:15 – 11:15 AM

Learning for Work and Citizenship

Participants will leave this session with a good understanding of how the board can best contribute to curriculum decisions in their institutions.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

How to Grapple with Quality Assurance: The New Work of the Academic Affairs Committee

Participants in this session will gain a strong understanding of the board’s responsibility for educational quality assurance, learn about key indicators and metrics that can help the board do its job, and get clearer on how best to engage with other constituencies both respectfully and robustly.

Track B: Changing Business Models
8:15 – 11:15 AM

Reputational Risks and Crises: What is the Role of the Board?

Enterprise risk management (ERM) can identify risks and opportunities to support preparation and response to an uncertain future, including reputational risks and crises. This session will highlight leading practices and case studies from successful ERM programs in higher education. Participants will learn how boards can ensure ERM supports effective governance, and practical ways the board can support the administration in developing an ERM program.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

How to Grapple with Quality Assurance: The New Work of the Academic Affairs Committee

Participants in this session will gain a strong understanding of the board’s responsibility for educational quality assurance, learn about key indicators and metrics that can help the board do its job, and get clearer on how best to engage with other constituencies both respectfully and robustly.

Track C: Effective Board Governance
8:15 – 11:15 AM

Reputational Risks and Crises: What is the Role of the Board?

Enterprise risk management (ERM) can identify risks and opportunities to support preparation and response to an uncertain future, including reputational risks and crises. This session will highlight leading practices and case studies from successful ERM programs in higher education. Participants will learn how boards can ensure ERM supports effective governance, and practical ways the board can support the administration in developing an ERM program.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

Best Practices for Fiduciary Effectiveness

Through examinations of actual case studies and facilitated peer learning, participants will learn best practices and key techniques for acting in accordance with fiduciary expectations of care, loyalty, and obedience, and they will develop a stronger understanding of the board’s relationship to various constituencies and stakeholder groups.

Sunday, April 14

Track A: Student Success
8:15 – 11:15 AM

Addressing Student Well-Being: Hunger, Homelessness, and Mental Health

Participants in this session will understand key terminology related to food insecurity, housing insecurity, and mental health and how they apply in college and university contexts; gain clarity on the legal and ethical responsibilities of their institutions when it comes to serving students in these circumstances; and learn about current best practices and promising opportunities for institutions serious about addressing students’ well-being for educational success.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

Effective Board Oversight of Intercollegiate Athletics

Participants in this session will learn from a leading national expert about where the board’s oversight responsibility begins and ends when it comes to athletics, as well as best practice approaches and tools to help your board do this important work well.

Track B: Changing Business Models
8:15 – 11:15 AM

Growing and Diversifying Revenue Streams

Participants will discuss specific strategies for developing new revenue streams. Approaches shared have an opportunity to increase revenue overall and position your institution for long-term prosperity.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

Toward Relevance and Appeal: Competing in Challenging Times

Participants in this session will learn how the board can help position institutions to better meet the competition imperative on each of these fronts, with fortitude and mission fidelity.

Track C: Effective Board Governance
8:15 – 11:15 AM

The New Work of the Governance Committee

Facilitators will guide participants through an interactive discussion of the new work needed from governance committees, including innovative approaches to achieving board diversity, identifying and establishing new board policies on emerging challenges like social media, enhancing strategic board engagement, and conducting useful board and trustee assessments among other issues.

12:30 – 3:30 PM

Breaking the Mold: Redesigning Your Boards Committee Structure to Enhance Board Performance

Participants in this session will learn best practices for considering and executing a board committees redesign. They will benefit from expert and peer wisdom about trends in committee structure, and keys to unlocking greater board effectiveness through the work of committees.

Thank you to our sustaining and event sponsors.

Sustaining Partners

TIAA
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Sustaining Champions

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Ruffalo Noel Levitz
AGB Search

Sustaining Sponsors

Baker Tilly
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Event Sponsors

AT&T
Christie Campus Health
Collegis Education
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National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity
Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP
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