How Presidential Evaluations Must Change, January/February 2012

Volume 20,  Number 1   //    January/February 2012

The first issue of Trusteeship for 2012 leads off with an important piece for any institution that will one day face a change of leadership at the top – which is to say, every institution: “How Presidential Evaluations Must Change,” by Terrence MacTaggart.  Moving on to the tightrope that modern board service can sometimes be, Stephen Pelletier uses Duke University as an example of “New Strategies for Managing Risks: A Balancing Act for Boards.” Think your institution will be immune from public records requests because it’s an independent, not a public? Rachel Levinson-Waldman and Robert O’Neil urge you to think again, in “Growing Demands for Public Records: How Should Boards Respond?” Theodore Marchese advises boards to manage wisely the time and opportunities between a president’s resignation and the next president’s assumption of office in “Making the Most of Presidential Transitions.” Once a new president is in the executive office, developing a strong working relationship with the board chair should be tops of the to-do list, according to Gettysburg College’s President, Janet Morgan Riggs, and Board Chair Robert N. Duelks, in “The Chair and the New President: Getting the First Months Right.” And finally, every institution hopes it won’t face hard times, but when it does, the board and administrators would be wise to follow Lawrence White’s counsel in “Governing During an Institutional Crisis: 10 Fundamental Principles.”

In This Issue:

How Presidential Evaluations Must Change
New Strategies for Managing Risks: A Balancing Act for Boards
Growing Demands for Public Records: How Should Boards Respond?
Making the Most of Presidential Transitions
The Chair and the New President: Getting the First Months Right
Governing During an Institutional Crisis: 10 Fundamental Principles
Preparing for an IRS Audit of Executive Compensation Decisions
The Whys and Wherefores of Whistleblowing
When, and Why, to Strategically Lower Tuition
Against the Wind: Governing Your University in an Era of Limited Financial Resources
The Big Risk in Not Assessing Risk
What Do American Auto Manufacturers and Higher Ed Have in Common?